Resort Uphill Policies

Please remember, as an uphill skier, you are a guest of these resorts.  Please respect their policies, employees, and patrons in order to keep this uphill privilege available. 

Choose your skin track to maximize visibility to other traffic while still maintaining a safe distance from such traffic.  In low-lighting conditions, think along the lines of bicycle safety, with a solid white headlamp in front, blinking red light(s) in back, and reflective clothing.  Remember that these are policies for uphill travel within the ski resort boundary, as opposed to backcountry access, which requires utilization of safe backcountry travel skills through potentially dangerous terrain.

If you have any updates to these policies (changes, additions, etc) please email us from the contact page using the ‘website’ category.

 

Alaska:

Arizona

California:

Colorado:

Connecticut

Maine

Massachusetts:

  • Wachusett: Early-morning ascent routes are skinner's left of Ralph's Run and Conifer Connection (as snowmobiles use the other side); uphill traffic must stop once the lifts open for the public (which is often as early as 15 minutes before stated opening times).

Montana:

New Hampshire:

 New Mexico

  • Sandia Peak: no policy, but generally allowed
  • Ski Santa Fe: no policy, but generally allowed
  • Taos: no officially allowed

New York:

Oregon:

 Pennsylvania

  • Elk Mountain: No allowed
  • Liberty: not allowed after hours, no official policy during hours
  • Round Top: not allowed after hours, no official policy during hours
  • White Tail: not allowed after hours, no official policy during hours

 Utah:

 Vermont:

 Washington:

 Wyoming